Caitlin UltimoBehavior / Breed Lists

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Dog Breed

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was named in honor of Charles II and was considered a fashionable lap dog for women in the 17th century.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Physical Characteristics

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is small bodied with a round head and fluffy ears that drop.

Color(s)

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is most commonly seen in red and white, black and tan, and solid red.

Coat

The coat of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is medium in length, and is soft, silky and moderately wavy.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Personality and Temperament

Activity Level

Moderate

Positives

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is easygoing and falls in love with nearly anyone.

Things to Consider

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel needs to be groomed regularly.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Care

Ideal Living Conditions

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel fares well in the city or country.

Special Requirements

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel needs constant attention from its human family.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Health

The following conditions are commonly seen in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels:

 

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel History and Background

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel has descended from spaniel roots, as is evident from the name. “Toy” dogs in Europe were produced by crossing small spaniels and Oriental toy breeds like the Tibetan Spaniel and the Japanese Chin. Also referred to as the comforter spaniels, these Tudor lapdogs functioned as foot- and lap-warmers and were also used to drive away fleas from the bodies of their owners. As all the family members liked the toy spaniels, they became immensely popular.

In the 18th century, King Charles II was so captivated with his toy spaniels, that it was alleged he paid no attention to his state. The dogs came to be regarded as King Charles Spaniels because of their close association with the King. After the king died, the Duke of Marlborough became the promoter of the breed and his favorite Blenheim or red-and-white breed gets its name from his estate. For generations, wealthy homes sheltered the King Charles Spaniel, but gradually the shorter-nosed dog became a more popular choice.

In the early 20th century, some dogs that looked like the early specimens of the breed were regarded as inferior. However, Roswell Eldridge, a wealthy American, visited England and offered a huge prize for the old-type spaniels with the best pointed noses. Thus, breeders went back to their old dogs and started developing them in order to win the money.

Although the short-nosed variety of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniels became more popular, but they were not instantly accepted in the United States.

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was finally recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1996, and is today known for its friendliness.


By: Chewy Editorial

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